Les Jacobins Monastery

Eight centuries of history

The Jacobins, a Dominican monastery built in 1229, is an exceptional testimony to southern gothic design. This brick architecture uses the same principles developed for the cathedrals of the kingdom of France.

A compelling past

In 1215 in Toulouse, Dominic of Osma founded the Order of Preachers that bears his name - the Dominican Order. At the time of the battle against the Cathar faith, this community placed dialogue and discussion at the heart of its way of life and its teachings.

As such, it played a major role in the creation of the first university of Toulouse in 1229. For many years the classes took place in the city's monasteries and convents, in particular at The Jacobins, the bell of which was used to mark the times for class.

 

A powerful symbol

By deciding to return the relics of St. Thomas Aquinas to his brothers, Pope Urban V sent them a clear sign. He supported the community of Preachers in its role as teachers and educators.

Today, these honoured relics are kept in the church.

 

An eventful destiny

During the revolution, the monastery was transformed into barracks. The cloister was partly destroyed, and stables and an infirmary were fitted out. The Jacobins did however maintain a strong identity that attracted the attention of the first inspector of Historical Monuments, Prosper Mérimée.

The renovation of the medieval monastery could therefore get underway.

 

Practical information
Opening hours and access :
Open every day from 10 am to 6 pm, except monday
Entrance through the church, rue Lakanal.
Accessibility to visitors with reduced mobility (some areas are currently being converted).
Metro : Capitole
Vélô Toulouse bike station: rue Gambetta
 
Admission charges
The ticket provides access to the cloister, the chapterhouse, the refectory and Saint Antonin's chapel
Single ticket: 4 euros
Concession: 2 euros